Kickstart This: Limit Theory

By: Alehkhs

On: November 21st, 2012

Limit Theory by Josh Parnell

Even with the genre showing that it is still alive and kicking with the recent return of two industry names, Chris Roberts (Star Citizen) and David Braben (Elite: Dangerous), it is especially exciting to see new, indie blood enter the space-sim scene.

Limit Theory is the newest space sim to launch a Kickstarter and, though it launches amid a wave of similar games, it has really caught my eye. Having been in development for only three months so far, the footage and screenshots that sole developer Josh Parnell is showing off on Kickstarter are already gorgeous. I don’t know if Mr. Parnell knew when he began this project just how much of a sucker I am for both open exploration in procedural worlds and spaceflight, but I feel like this game is fueled by my fever dreams.

A sandbox RPG/RTS in a procedurally-generated universe filled with procedurally-generated planets and traversed by procedurally-generated ships all fighting and trading across infinity. Limit Theory promises a lot, but also has substance to show and definite passion to drive it into the future. Go check out the project’s webpage for more information, and be sure to drop any questions in the Kickstarter’s comments section, where Mr. Parnell seems quite active in responding to the community.

  • alasta

    I wish more space games would use a cockpit view, then we can use a flight stick.

  • Tommy

    Definitely, I was disappointed when I learned that Space Citizen would have an external view as it definitely gives a combat advantage over cockpit view, which I prefer.

  • Commander Jameson

    Chris Roberts’ game is called Star Citizen, not Space Citizen.

  • Anonymous

    Whoops. And to think I backed it…

  • Anonymous

    Sharing your starting seed should give you the option to play that as a multi-player game.

  • Sebastian

    A game that proudly announces “no story” on its website… sorry, no. No, no, no. :(

  • space

    we are doing 1st & 3rd person view. Also.. its not in our video’s yet. but our new shuttle console (flight controls thing) has a keyboard and joystick (instead of mouse) for the charachter… and the player to see some response :) check youtube backspace game

  • space

    please have a look at what we are doing.. would like to get some comments.

  • mtar

    “My sculpture is a just a rock. It is up to the user to carve it into a desired shape. Gosh that has so much freedom! It could could be a bear or a dragon or a robot or a pirate or a potato…”. Great, but I suspect I might go for Michelangelo instead.

  • Anonymous

    Story in games are overrated. Games are about interaction, exploration and experimentation. Games aren’t about some author’s fantasy, they’re about you, the player, and how you can alter and shape the world you’re wandering into by responding to its challenges. If you want a good story, read a book or watch a movie.

    Don’t get me wrong though. A good narrative can add a lot to a game, just like good music, stereoscopy or haptic feedback can. It’s just not a requirement for a good game.

  • Kyrith

    Games are about whatever they decide to be about; this is art, there aren’t rules, only guidelines and tips.

  • Anonymous

    That’s true to a certain extent.

    At some point, if some thing doesn’t fit the basic criteria of a game, it’s not called a game anymore.

    Games, by definition, require goals, challenge, rules, and interaction. These are the core elements. If something lacks any of those, it’s not a game, exactly like you wouldn’t call something a “painting” if there wasn’t any paint involved.

    But yeah, game developers are free to make their games about whatever they want. I think it’s just important to remember that narratives aren’t part of the essence of what makes a game.

  • Kyrith

    Then it’s not a “game,” who cares? The only reason we still have to use that term is that no one has thought of a better one, and until then we’ll call them video games.

  • Anonymous

    Actually, there are better terms to describe products that lack some of the elements of a game. The Graveyard, for instance, is interactive media, or digital art.

    People tend to call anything with real-time graphics a “video game”, but in the end, this only dilutes what games truly are.

    Imagine, for instance, that the next Final Fantasy was just one epic cutscene, with no gameplay whatsoever. It still mostly runs on the game’s 3D engine, with some intercut FMVs. Is it still a game then? Even if it has no elements of interaction, no goals or challenge?

  • Kyrith

    no, like I said, it would not, by technical definition, be a game. But whether or not some have used phrases like “interactive art” to describe what would have previously been considered video games, the point remains, most people use the word “game.” Also, terms like “interactive art” just sound really pretentious, I know it’s art, and you know it’s art, but neither “cinema” or “literature” were insecure enough that they had to put it in their name.

  • Kyrith

    no, like I said, it would not, by technical definition, be a game. But whether or not some have used phrases like “interactive art” to describe what would have previously been considered video games, the point remains, most people use the word “game.” Also, terms like “interactive art” just sound really pretentious, I know it’s art, and you know it’s art, but neither “cinema” or “literature” were insecure enough that they had to put it in their name.

  • Anonymous

    Hey, maybe it sounds kinda pretentious, but it’s accurate. And honestly, I’d rather call things by their name than be that guy who calls all media players “iPods”.

  • Kyrith

    But would you rather be the guy calling it by the term nobody else uses?

  • Anonymous

    If I’m the guy who tilts the balance and makes everyone start using the right term, then yeah :)